Tuesday, February 03, 2009

On the journey of our life

Having born in this world, we are all on our individual journey called life. Our journey has begun. We are all traveling this great journey now. And until this great journey ends, we study, we play, we lie, and we work and make love. Sometimes we also meet new people who sometimes leave big impressions on our mind.

On my way back to Japan last October, I had a transit in Dhaka. After bearing all the hassles of transiting, I at last boarded my Thai Airways flight to Bangkok. I was adjusting myself in my seat when a neatly dressed Bengali guy ushered in a poorly dressed nervous looking guy to the seat next to mine.

Wearing a faded T-Shirt and blue cotton pants, he might have been my age. But he looked older. His cracked hands told the story of a tough struggle. He carried no hand luggage, except for a yellow file. The well-dressed Bengali guy said something to him in a commanding tone which probably meant “This is where you remain seated until we get to the destination.”

He looked at me nervously. I smiled. An understanding smile, not a condescending one. Such empathy is natural for me. Probably I owe it to my own humble upbringing and growing up in a Buddhist environment. He adjusted his seat belts clumsily. Maybe it was his first flight.

After sometime, the neatly dressed guy was again passing through the aisle. My seat mate raised his hand and called to him. He had wanted to ask him something. But the neat man simply pretended not to hear.

The plane began to taxi for take-off. My new friend seemed more comfortable now. We somehow found ourselves trying to strike up a conversation.

In Hindi, it was. My Hindi is very very poor, and his was poorer. Limited to few words, we somehow began.

Me: “Name?”

He: “Mohammad”.

Me: “Me”, pointing to myself, I said, “Cigay.”

He: “Going where?”

Me: “Japan.”

He: “Why?”

Me: “Study”.
Me: “You, going where?”

He: “Malaysia. To work in the construction and factory there.”

Me: “You from Dhaka?”

He: “No. My home, one day by bus from Dhaka.”

Me: “You wife and kids?”

He: “Yes. Wife and one kid at home.”

Me: “I also, wife and kid at home. Same Same!”

Me: “When? Come back Bangladesh?”

He: “One year, two years. Don’t know. Need money.”

And as we conversed with our limited common vocabulary and sign language, we both felt a strange sense of camaraderie. We were both going away to foreign lands, leaving behind our families, in order to pursue our dreams.

As I laid back to take a nap, my friend was looking out of the window, on the white clouds below, that rose like mountains of white cotton. Probably, inside those endlessly rolling billows, he was seeing his wife and kid smiling and waiting for him in front of their thatched hut, some where by the bamboo groves by the side of a rural river.

And as I rolled back against my inclining seat, I also plunged myself into a reverie of my family back home. When I awoke, it was time to land at Bangkok.

Before we disembarked, we shook hands. I wished him safe journey on his connecting flight to Malaysia, and good luck and success in his new job in a new land. He seemed very pleased and happy. He made a gesture of thanking his God. And he wished me the same.

I was waiting for my next flight to Osaka inside the Airport, when I saw him again. This time, he was in long queue of Bengali men – all like him holding a yellow file each, led by the neatly dressed guy. He saw me too. He waved at me smiling. I smiled and waved at him.

Then my eyes slowly drifted from the long line of Bengali men holding yellow files to the myriad of other travelers – white, black, brown, yellow, fat, slim, ugly, beautiful, all in hurry - all wanting to be happy and avoid suffering. Then my mind finally rested on myself. And I thought, “We all. Same, Same!”

Monday, February 02, 2009

ブータン:雷龍の国

日本人が日本国のことを「ジャパン」ではなく「にほん」と呼ぶのと同じように、私たちブータン人はブータンのことを「ブータン」ではなく「雷龍の国」を意味する「ドルック・ユル」と呼んでいます。この呼び名は、ブータンに伝来し繁栄した仏教の一派である「ドルックパ」に由来しています。ブータンは、独自の「国民総幸福量」という開発哲学を国の最終目標とし、物質的豊かさだけではなく心の豊かさに重点を置き、豊かな文化と自然を多く持つ、幸福で平和な仏教王国としてその魅力がここ最近世界に知られてきています。

ヒマラヤの東の麓に位置するブータンは、北にチベット自治区を含む広大な中国と南にインドを国境とし、面積が九州ほどの大きさでありながら、標高は200メートルから7000メートルにおよび、人口は約60万人です。

歴史上、一度も植民地化されたことがないという事実は、ブータン人にとっての誇りであります。1974年に最初の観光客が入国するまで、鎖国政策の中で海外との接触を避け、独自の伝統と文化を維持・発展させてきました。これは、丁度日本が長い鎖国政策の下、世界から孤立し、日本独自の伝統・文化の内省にみちびかれたのと同じことです。

日本のように、親や年上の方、先生を敬うことはブータンの社会でもとても重要視されています。ブータンの国語であるゾンカ語にも尊敬語があります。また、人から贈り物を受け取る時に内心は嬉しくても、習慣的に受け取ることを躊躇するという習慣が日本にあるということも、日本で生活していて気がつきました。他にも多くの共通点があります。そのため、日本人の行動・振る舞いを理解するのに、全く異なる文化を持つ他の外国人が苦労することがあるのに対して、私にとっては、そう難しくはありません。
おそらく、ブータンと日本の文化的共通点は、仏教的価値観に由来するのだろうと思います。けれども、日本という国はその長い歴史の中で文化的・社会的に仏教国の一つではありますが、現代日本のほとんどの若者は、進んで仏教やその他の宗教に対しての信仰心を持つことに興味を抱いていないように思われます。一方、ブータンでは、仏教信仰は人々の生活の中に今も鮮やかに生きています。
ほとんどのブータン人の家庭には仏間があり、毎日、三宝(仏・法・僧)に帰依するための祭壇があります。お供え物としては、水・花・果物・私たちが食する食べ物を捧げます。たいてい、朝と夜就寝前にお祈りをしますが、これといって厳しい決まりはありません。一年に少なくとも数回は、家に僧侶を招き、生きとし生けるものすべてのための幸福と健康を願って儀式や祈祷をしてもらいます。このような儀式はとても厳粛であり、かつ心温まる大切な行事です。
ブータンには、数多くのお寺があります。なかには、8世紀からのものもあります。日本にも多くの寺がありますが、日常的に寺を参拝する日本人は少ないと思います。ブータンには、ゾンと呼ばれる石と木で創られたお城のような建物と寺が、観光向けのアトラクションとしてではなく、神聖な記念碑として実在します。仏陀が最初に説教を説いた特別な日のようなおめでたい吉日には、人々は寺に集まりお供えをし、法要をします。
ブータンで、お年を召した老人は、家族の支えによって生活し、経を唱えたり、仏舎利等の周りを歩き周ったり、療養所で隠遁したりして、その時間を過ごします。彼らはこのように精神的追及を実践することによって、残りの人生の新たな意義と喜びを見つけます。これといって何もすることがなくても、彼らの表情は喜びと充足感に満たされています。
私たちも、たくさんおのお祭りをします。新年や季節の祭りの他に家でもお祝い事をします。特に、ゾンで催されるツェチュと呼ばれる祭りが有名です。各町や村に独自のツェチュ祭があります。その際に、一番上等の民族衣装を着て祭りに参加し、ツェチュ一番の見ものでる仮面舞踊を観に出かけます。仮面舞踊はエンターテイメントの要素よりも、有徳な生死観を表わす特別な宗教的意味が込められています。
徳島での阿波踊りを観た時に、ツェチュ祭のことを思い出しました。4,5歳の子供から、85歳の方まで踊りに参加し、とても見応えがありました。踊りのリズム、若い女性の優雅さや、男性の機敏さは目を見張るものがありました。
ブータンの主食は米です。ご飯と一緒に、野菜や魚、牛・豚・鳥などの肉を食べます。しかし、日本食と違って、唐辛子を大量に料理に使います。
日本と違って、私たちは、小学校から国語であるゾンカと同様に英語を勉強します。というのも、ゾンカで書かれた現代科学や技術に関する教科書がないからです。日本語では、ありとあらゆる本があるので、とてもいいと思います。
日本の天皇のように、ブータンには国王がいます。最近、ジグミ・センゲ・ワンチュック第4代国王が国の政治システムを民主化することに着手し始めました。2006年12月、彼は自ら王位から退き、26歳の若き皇太子を第5代国王として任じました。これは、2008年より、立憲君主制に国が移行し、初めて実施される国民選挙に向けての準備であります。 数十年もの間、ブータンの寛大な父として国をリードし、私たちを民主化へと導いた思いやりのある前国王を懐かしむ想いと、感謝の気持ちでいっぱいです。
しかしこのことは、何も留まるものはなく、一切は移り変わるとういことを私たちに思い出させてくれただけのことです。時の変化とともに、私たちも変化し進歩しなくてはなりません。ブータンには、達成すべき目標が多くあります。その一つは、経済的自立です。
経済的に、日本とブータンは正反対です。ブータンは経済的に豊かではありませんが、貧困はみられず、幸せに暮らしています。医療と教育は無料です。ブータンの歳入は、水力発電による電力を隣国に売ることや、日本のような国から援助を受けて成り立っています。
私たちは、必然的に伝統的社会から近代社会へ変化しつつある情勢の中で、伝統的価値観を見失わないように注意しながら、日本のような経済大国から経済的目標を達成するために日々邁進しています。ブータンは日本からたくさんのことを学んでいます。しかし、時々日本は経済的豊かさを追求するあまり、何か大切なものを見失っているのではないかと疑問に思うこともあります。その場合、物質的豊かさと精神的豊かさのバランスを保とうとするブータンの姿勢からも、日本が学ぶことがないでしょうか。

チェリン・スィーゲイ・ドルジ
(Tshering Cigay Dorji)
 M2, 青江研究室、工学部 (2007)。
This article was written for Tokushima University’s magazine ‘Tokutalk’ in 2007. The link to the online version of the article published in the magazine can be found here:
http://www.tokushima-u.ac.jp/pdf/kaigai127.pdf